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Vibe Houston Stream

12:00 am 8:00 pm

Current show

Vibe Houston Stream

12:00 am 8:00 pm

Background

Day: May 2, 2021

No “college drop-outs” here. A group of young heavy-hitters from Houston are grinding with “educated execution” to make a name for themselves in the entertainment industry — all while living out their college dreams. Black Waves Entertainment is a Houston-based label of young, talented artists established in 2016 by 19-year-old Myles Davis (Wavy M), along with the collaborative efforts of close friend Myles Taylor (Karrien Ca$h), who is 20 years old. Two more artists, 18-year-old Luc Silvs and 20-year-old Zae6ix, round out the independent label. The artists are managed by Louis Rose, 20, who has earned the nickname “Just the Manager,” even though he also does features on the projects. Another member of the team, Shannon Madison, 20, serves as social media manager and videographer. As a younger label, the group has had to learn and adapt to writing, producing, recording, and engineering their own music. Rose says this sets Black Waves apart from others. It should also be noted that the group says the pandemic forced them to stretch their creative sides even more, as they had to get more innovative to make things happen. Most of the artists and team members are still in college. “Wavy M” attends the University of Texas at Austin and comes home to Houston to record and film videos with the team. “Karrien Ca$h” attends Sam Houston State in Huntsville. Luc Silvs, the label’s executive engineer, does all of the mixing work while going to Texas Tech University in Lubbock. And Louis “Just the Manager” attends the University of Houston in the Third Ward/ Museum District. These “college kids” are ones to watch! The group is always looking to bring others on board, so if there are any Texas Southern University artists interested, contact the group’s manager. On Apple Music: When This is Over by Wavy M Ciabatta Boyz by Karrien Ca$h Getaway Driver by Luc Silvs Face of God by ZAE6IX

UnWine is a hidden jewel nestled in the heart of Houston’s thriving Third Ward community on the Almeda corridor. The upscale wine bar has become a mainstay for locals since it was opened in 2014 by clothier Lawrence McQueen. McQueen began hosting small events monthly at his store, McQueen’s Custom Tailoring and Clothing, where people could listen to music and sip while they shopped. The events became so popular that McQueen decided to expand with a second business. He opened “UnWine,” a swanky bar where wine lovers could listen to jazz, relax and educate themselves on the large collection of wines featuring vineyards from all over the world, including Africa. Guests can also choose from the Tapas menu of small plate food items as they sit out on the rooftop and enjoy the views of downtown Houston. A native of Detroit, Michigan, McQueen considers himself a modern-day Renaissance Man, which is expressed in the art and décor beautifully designed throughout his venue. We had a chance to speak with the “hippest cat” in H-Town, who’s managed to stay on top as an entrepreneur for over 20 years. Vibe: What do you feel is the best feature of your restaurants…the food or the atmosphere, or is it something else? McQueen: I have to give most of the credit to my managing partner, Shearone Lewis, because she makes sure the energy is always spectacular and everything is of the highest quality. We offer specialty plates that can’t be found anywhere in the city like our Spinach and Collard Green Dip. We also educate our customers on the best food and wine pairings, like our smoked chicken and cranberry scallions with cranberry drizzle that’s paired with our Rosé wines from California. Another great feature we have is our large rooftop bar, where you can enjoy casual conversations, have a cigar and listen to live music. Vibe: How have you adjusted during COVID? McQueen: We were shut down for a period, but for the most part, we scaled back our hours and cut back on everything. We are just now increasing hours, but the hardest part for us — and a lot of hospitality businesses that I have spoken with agree — is that the workforce became extremely fragmented. It’s hard to find people who want to work in the service industry. We need chefs and bar backs, but a good majority are not willing to work because the government is paying them unemployment. So at the moment, trying to move to full capacity has been the biggest adjustment. Vibe: What do you do to give back to the community? McQueen: Prior to COVID, we would offer the venue to charities, fundraisers and political organizations to host their events free of charge. We also make it a point to seek out Black-owned wineries who actually make their own wine. And we are very big on inviting local artists and musicians to come out and host shows and perform, or display their art inside the bar.   Vibe: How do you feel about the renewed interest or national push of supporting Black businesses? Do you think it will be short-lived? McQueen: I certainly hope not! A lot of individuals are sympathetic to small businesses that may or may not have survived COVID, but it’s a shame that COVID had to happen for more people to support us. We definitely have seen an influx of people coming out, now more than ever. They say good things come out of hard times. So hopefully this will be one of those good things that will come out of this pandemic. Vibe: Any advice to entrepreneurs or small business owners fighting to stay afloat during these challenging times? McQueen: I would tell them to let this be a teachable moment to stack your money while you can, and be strategic in how you move at all times. If you are fortunate enough to get a PPP or EIDL loan, or had a good stock pile pre-COVID, I would advise you to invest wisely so you can at least keep your business afloat when things like this happen. This should be a lesson to entrepreneurs to save and invest wisely when you are up, so you won’t ever get down. More information on UnWine: Address: 4420 Almeda. Houston, TX 77004 Phone: 832-804-9560 Click here to visit the website. Click here to “Like” and follow on Facebook.

A “Renaissance Man” is defined as a person of many talents or areas of knowledge. Ash Davito definitely fits that bill. From modeling, to acting, self-publishing his own books, and writing and directing his own feature films, he’s done it all. Davito has written and directed numerous projects, including Temp to Fire (2015), and has been an actor in As I Die Slowly (2011) and God Send Me a Man (2009), alongside Robin Givens. Adding to that, he’s now launched a new record label, Global Keys Records, executive producing and publishing music for various artists. We sat down to chat with Davito to see how he “vibes.” Vibe: How do you describe yourself? Tell us, who is Ash Davito? Davito: I would describe myself as a creative visionary. If you were to ask me what I do, I would tell you, “Whatever needs to be done.” I have always believed in myself as early as I can remember. Any goal or dream I’ve ever set out to accomplish, I have. Simply, I’m a God fearing man from Sunnyside, Texas who is passionate about helping others. Vibe: What projects are you currently working on? Davito: I’m currently promoting “MY TOWN” by Mugg Man feat. Jon Glenn, in which I wrote and produced. It is doing very well on YouTube. My next project is an R&B ballad I wrote called “I CROWN YOU” by artist Lori Dansby feat. Jon Glenn. After that, the label will be releasing music in the Afro and Reggae genres. Vibe: What do you feel about the Houston entertainment scene? Davito: I feel like Houston’s entertainment scene has really blossomed in the last five years alone. Now you can find various locations for just about any kind of entertainment you want to see. Some of the greatest entertainers in the world were birthed in Houston. I don’t think that enough artists and business professionals come together, however, I understand that you just can’t work with everyone regardless of how much you may like to. Personally, I believe that needing nothing attracts everything. The less time I spend depending on others, the more time I have to focus on bettering myself as a businessman, CEO and visionary. Vibe: You say you wear many hats, why is it important to learn various aspects of the business? Davito: It’s essential to learn how every level of your field of business works. Even if I’m weak in a specific area, it’s my obligation as a “leader” to know enough about that area to be able to identify the ideal person or resource we may need on the team to strengthen it. In my opinion, that’s the way to limit any inefficiencies across the board. The more you know, the more you can share, and the less people can take advantage of you. Vibe: From a business owner’s perspective, what are the most common mistakes you’ve seen made in this industry? Davito: The most common mistakes I’ve seen are business owners not actually owning their intellectual property. That is a liability. For instance, I’ve heard so many artists say how people have stolen the ideas they’ve shared with them. First, your business has to be properly structured and you need a clear plan of action for your product, and personally, I don’t ever talk about a project that has not been copyrighted, already published commercially or has already been manifested and ready for the next level. Vibe: How important is collaboration? Davito: Collaboration is extremely important to me. That doesn’t necessarily mean you have to workwith a lot of people, but it’s very important that you collaborate with the right people — people who are assets and not liabilities. I also love to collaborate with other businesses, using my projects and platforms to promote them as we work to build strong partnerships. Vibe: When looking to collaborate with someone, what do you look for? Davito: I look at their character and spirit first. Talent means nothing if we don’t “vibe” together, period. If the person is humble, hungry, willing to learn, willing to grow and most importantly, willing to invest in themselves, and I’m doing the same, then it’s a “win-win” situation for us all. Vibe: How important is mentorship? Davito: Although success is subjective, mentorship is literally what being successful is all about. I’m only here doing what I do today because a mentor sat me down my senior year in high school and simply asked me, “What do you want to do with your life?” That lead to everything that I am doing today. One simple conversation changed my life so I’m always asking the youth I encounter while speaking at Career Days at various schools or just in random conversations “what do they want to do with their futures” and I try to make sure they understand how to have a plan of action to work toward their goals. Vibe: What have you learned during this pandemic? Davito: During this pandemic, I learned that I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. I started Global Keys Records Corporation on July 13, 2020, in the midst of the pandemic at a very challenging time in my life. How dare I start a record company and teach myself the music business and actually follow through with everything I set out to do? I learned how to believe in myself and others even when nobody else did. Most importantly I learned how to exercise my faith and potential. I wrote my first professional song at that time, and a few months later, it was on the market and has now grown over 60,000 views for the music video on YouTube and still going. I feel that it’s nothing I can’t do if I’m willing to unlock my potential within. Vibe: What advice do you have to give anyone who is out here grinding with a dollar and a dream? Davito: Don’t stop. Nothing comes easy. And — you have to think anyway so you may


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